Posts Tagged ‘rosneft’

Russia, Italy, Turkey confirm Samsun-Ceyhan pipeline deal

ENI logoThe Vice Prime Minister of the Russian Federation, Igor Ivanovich Sechin, the Russian Minister of Energy, Sergei Shmatko, the Minister of Energy of the Republic of Turkey, Taner Yildiz and the Minister for Economic Development of the Italian Republic, Claudio Scajola, signed today in Milan a joint statement concerning the construction of the Samsun-Ceyhan oil pipeline between Turkey’s Black Sea coast and its Mediterranean coast.

The agreement testifies the level of cooperation among the three Governments, in particular in the energy sector, and it underlines their joint commitment to enhance energy security in their respective countries and in the European market through the diversification of transport routes, as well as the protection of the environment.

In line with the agreements signed in Ankara on August 6th 2009 by the representatives of the Russian Federation and the Republic of Turkey, which envisage the participation of Russian oil companies in the Samsun-Ceyhan Project, the Ministers agree that this initiative will contribute to strengthening security of supply, to protecting the environment and to enhanced cooperation.

At the same time, representatives of Eni, Calik Holding, JSC Transneft and Rosneft, the energy companies involved, signed a Memorandum of Understanding which envisages the commitment to discuss the definition of the economic and contractual conditions for Russian companies to participate in the Samsun-Ceyhan Project in order to ensure the volume of crude that would guarantee the economic sustainability of the project.

Eni (NYSE:ENI) has been heavily involved in the oil pipeline project since 2005 and will play a leading role in its realization. In 2006, Eni bought 50% of Trans Anadolu Pipeline Company (TAPCO), the company designed for the realization and management of the Samsun Ceyhan pipeline.

The project has been developed taking environmental issues into consideration and adopting measures which comply with the most rigorous international safety standards. Furthermore, in order to cause minimal disturbance to the environment and existing infrastructure, the pipeline will be built along existing pipeline routes.

The Samsun-Ceyhan pipeline will facilitate safer transport across the Bosphorus and Dardanelles Straits as well as reducing the impact on the region’s complex and delicate ecosystem.

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China in “Scramble for Africa”

Guinea

Guinea

Chinese interest in acquiring “strategic assets” continues unabated, with recent acquisitions & investments in a number of companies in Australia & South America.

As we saw in last weeks bullish approach regarding Nigerian oil, China is looking a little further afield & it’s all seeing eye has settled upon Africa. The latest country to be courted is the Republic of Guinea as China seeks to gain access to the West African nation’s large mineral deposits.

The impoverished nation possesses more than 25 billion tonnes of bauxite ore, with more than 150 mineable deposits having been prospected to date. Additionally, Guinea’s mineral wealth includes more than 4 billion tonnes of high-grade iron ore, significant diamond and gold deposits & as yet undetermined quantities of uranium. Bauxite exports account for more than 75% of GDP, according to Wiki sources.

Guinea’s Minister for mines was quoted in the Financial Times as saying that the Guinean government is in talks with the China International Fund (CIF) regards a $7Bn investment into a number of projects including infrastructure, minerals & oil.

“Instead of just giving natural resources… in exchange for promises of developing our infrastructure, we decided to take the joint venture approach and co-own not only the infrastructure development companies and projects, but also whatever natural resource companies or projects are developed jointly.” said Mohamed Thiam “All the government’s stakes in various mining projects will be put in that mining company. Future mining permits or concessions that the government decided to develop on its own will be put in that company,”

China still doesn’t seem to be too picky regarding who it does business with, as the present Guinean government is a military dictatorship that has recently put down a bloody coup last month. 150 people were killed on September 28, when troops opened fire on a crowd  gathered in  the capital Conakry, in order to protest at ongoing corruption in Captain Moussa Dadis Camara‘s rule.

Sidya Toure, who leads the only effective opposition & is a former prime minister was quoted “I do not understand how you can believe that we can inject this kind of money into the economy of Guinea where the total gross domestic product is only three billion dollars.”

CIF is also planning to form a consortium with the Guinean government & near neighbour Angola’s state oil company Sonangol to look at prospecting for oil off Guinea’s coast. As we reported previously, West Africa has become a hotbed of speculation & investment, as new oil fields are coming under development in Ghana, Angola, & Senegal. It is considered likely that offshore Guinea will also provide new hydrocarbon deposits that can be exploited.

What is interesting is that CIF on the face of things, does not seem to be an officially backed government company, whereas all the recent deals have been undertaken either by the Chinese Development Bank or via large state owned enterprises such as CNOOC or Chalco. CIF is registered in Hong Kong & an inspection of the website gives very little information on the structure of the entity.

Last November, as it became clear that the global economy was heading into a recessionary period, central government in Beijing implemented a 4 Trillion yuan/$586 Bn stimulus package, aimed at cushioning the blow of decreasing exports on the economy whilst also improving industrial efficiency at all levels, with energy receiving a special focus.

Adopting various measures such as tax reductions, rebates, fiscal subsidies, improved access to credit & direct government expenditure, central government has been encouraging state owned oil companies such as Petrochina & CNOOC to expand foreign investment in upstream opportunities, whilst increasing domestic refining capacity & oil product stockpiles.

We have seen a number of examples of this with Russia signing a 20 year $25Bn oil supply contract in February, which will see Rosneft supplying up to 300,000 bpd of oil via it’s East Siberia-Pacific Ocean (ESPO) oil pipeline to China. This was closely followed by the China Development Bank extending a $10Bn loan to Brazil’s state owned company Petrobras in return for securing strategic oil supply contracts & this month CNOOC has made a bid to acquire more than 16% of Nigeria‘s stated oil reserves.

It would appear that sentiment is currently running against Western based IOC’s & countries in emerging markets that have currently untapped or underdeveloped  hydrocarbon deposits are enjoying the ability to play interested parties off against one another. What is interesting to me is the fact that China seems to be playing Guinea at arms length via what is in effecr a shell company, allowing them to hold up a clean pair of hands on an international basis.

This desire to secure resources at what would seem “any cost” should, in our opinion, receive close attention from both a geo-political & investment point of view. IOCs will not be able to compete in areas where there are no rules, particularly in Africa, whilst it looks like China will circumvent accepted norms using any available route to acheive their aims.

Original article published at MyStockVoice

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the Bear & the Dragon shake hands on $25Bn energy deal

siberianpipeline1Whilst having previously discussed the Byzantine workings of Russia’s energy players in previous articles & also the direction that China has taken recently in securing strategic reserves, it was only a matter of time befiore the Dragon & the Bear came to an accord together. During a visit to China this week, Russian Deputy Prime Minister Igor Sechin has succeeded in bringing together a massive deal for Russian oil producers in Siberia.

On Tuesday (17/02/09), Russia and China signed  an intergovernmental agreement on the construction of a branch of the East Siberia-Pacific Ocean (ESPO) oil pipeline toward China. Under this agreement, Russia will supply 15 million metric tons (300,000 barrels per day) of crude oil annually for 20 years to China, in return China via state owned China National Petroleum Company (CNPC) will extend a total of $25 billion in loans to Russian state-controlled crude producer Rosneft and pipeline operator Transneft at 6% per annum in exchange for the long-term oil supply. Transneft plans to start building a Chinese leg of the East Siberia-Pacific Ocean later this year and to commission it in 2010, Russia’s monopoly pipeline operator said in a statement on Tuesday.

“The construction of the leg should be synchronized with the construction of the first line of the ESPO pipeline,” the statement quoted the company’s vice president, Mikhail Barkov, as saying. Barkov also said that China’s $10 billion loan to Transeft would primarily be invested in the construction of the Chinese leg. “In addition, there are projects that will contribute to the functioning of the entire eastern pipeline and this leg in particular,” the Transneft official said.

The pipeline’s first leg was launched in October 2008 in the reverse direction, running westwards. The construction of the pipeline, designed to bring Russian oil to the lucrative Asia-Pacific market, is due to be completed later this year, which will enable ESPO to pump its first oil eastwards. The terms of the agreement stipulate that China will extend a $15 billion loan to Russian state-run oil giant Rosneft against the guarantee of oil supplies, while Transneft’s $10 billion would be granted with the infrastructure as collateral. Currently Rosneft, which is expected to be the main oil exporter via the pipeline, supplys around 10 million tonnes of oil a year to China by railway under the terms of a deal signed in 2004.

The ESPO was originally conceived in the mid-90’s by now disgraced Yukos Chairman, Mikhail Khodorkovsky, as a private pipeline. Following the “collapse” of Yukos, state owned Transneft picked up the baton & began construction of the first leg in 2006, which completed last year. The pipeline is supplied via spurs from the Tomsk Oblast & Khanty-Mansi Autonomous Okrug oil fields in Western Siberia, Transneft’s existing Omsk-Irkutsk pipeline has also been connected, allowing Rosneft to pump up to 22 million tons of oil annually into the pipeline, whilst smaller competitor Surgutneftegas will contribute around 8 million tons.

Anglo-Russian or Russo-Anglo (depending on which side of the political fence you sit on) TNK-BP is also involved in this project, having began supplying oil to the pipeline in October 2008. TNK-BP in a joint venture with Rosneft has extensive operations in the Verkhnechonskoye field, which has proven reserves of 409 million barrels of oil equivalent.

“The first shipment of VC crude into the ESPO marks an important event for TNK-BP and for the industry.” commented Chief Operating Officer Tim Summers at the launch. ” We are establishing a major new production center in East Siberia. Application of world—class technology and the timely launch of the ESPO pipeline allowed us to begin commercial development of this project, which has been deemed uneconomic for the past 30 years. The beginning of regular commercial shipments from VC to the ESPO marks the emergence of East Siberia as a new and important oil and gas province in Russia”.

So win-win all round? Certainly for the Chinese in the long term, as we have argued in previous articles, China is on a spending spree on commodities, particularly in the energy sector where it seems almost desperate to secure strategic reserves. Russia also gains, in that with the recent devaluation of the rouble, access to funding in capital markets has been harder to come by, especially for Russia’s energy firms. Do we in the West gain from this ? That remains to be seen, from a persoanl viewpoint, this may well help to stabilise geo-political issues in the region whilst also contributing to oil price stability in the long run.